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Monthly Archives: December 2007

Cold War and Veterans Links

LINKS

http://kdvamerica.org/
http://www.northchinamarines.com/
http://www.coldwar.org/
http://www.imjinscout.com/
http://www.amervets.com/
http://www.kdvamerica.org/
http://www.marineriders.org/
http://www.usmarineraiders.org/
http://www.edva.us/
http://www.vfw.org/
http://www.dav.org/
http://www.55srwa.org/
http://www.wilsoncenter.org/
http://www.coldwarhistory.us/
http://www.naav.com/
http://www.afmissileers.org/
http://www.afsahq.org/
http://www.jfklibrary.org/
http://www.naav.com/
http://www.afmissileers.org/
http://www.afsahq.org/

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The news brief yesterday morning triggered some Cold War memories: ”Russia Successfully Tests New Nuclear Missile.” Haven’t we put the old nuclear tensions aside, the worries about Mutual Assured Destruction?

Tuesday Russia launched a new intercontinental missile capable of carrying multiple warheads. The RS-24 missile’s three dummy warhead hit their targets 4,340 miles to the east on the Kamchatka Peninsula. What happened to the arms limitation treaties that had the former Soviet Union and the United States destroying their nuclear arsenals?

A resurgent Russia under outgoing President Vladimir Putin has begun to flex its military muscle once again. Besides restoring some economic luster to his nation, Mr. Putin is also trying to rebuild its eroded military might. Russians love him for it and in part, this is why editors at Time magazine named him their ”Man of the Year.”

U.S. and European foreign policy has allowed Mr. Putin and Russian military leaders to justify their actions as necessary to counter ”western imperialism.” They don’t believe the missile defense system President Bush wants to deploy on their western border in Poland and the Czech Republic is only intended for Iran and North Korea. They think it’s aimed at them.

Although, Mr. Putin has used Russia’s oil profits to dramatically increase military spending — to $33.6 billion — that’s a fraction of the $582 billion the United States spent this year. Russia still has 875 missiles and bombers capable of delivering 4,237 warheads. But 60 percent of the missiles are past their service life and require extensive maintenance. (The U.S. nuclear arsenal is 5,914 warheads on 1,225 missiles and bombers.)

The threat isn’t so much Russia’s military buildup as much as what saber rattling can lead to: continued diplomatic misunderstandings and potent weapons for sale to rogue nations. A new ICBM in Russia’s hands isn’t as dangerous as in Iran or North Korea’s. Smarter diplomacy can defuse this threat better than missile shields.

Bhutto Assassination: Video Last Moments of Benazir Bhutto

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Benazir Bhutto has been assassinated in Pakistan. Her husband has confirmed her death. There is video being shown now that shows her last moments right before her death on all of the major cable news networks. She is shown leaving a rally in the last moments before her death.

Bhutto Assassination: Video Shows Last Moments of Benazir Bhutto (Image: Wenn)
Bhutto Assassination: Video Shows Last Moments of Benazir Bhutto (Image: Wenn)

Video from the scene also shows several people being loaded into ambulances. There were several cameras rolling, but no video has yet been shown of the actual shooting. It is not clear if the actual gunshots were caught on video.

***

She was shot in the neck and the chest, according to a report from Fox News. They have a video report here. At least twenty other were killed in a subsequent explosion. The assassin blew himself up, and detonated a suicide bomb that caused massage carnage after she was killed by bullets. Photos from that are here at Fox News but be warned they are very graphic.

The attack took place as Bhutto was leaving a political rally where she addressed thousands before the country’s Jan. 8 parliamentary elections. Bhutto, who led Paksitan from 1988 to 1990 and was the country’s first female prime minister.

***

In November, Bhutto had also planned a rally in the city, but President Pervez Musharraf forced her to cancel it, citing security fears. Political tension is at fever pitch in the country, and residents are being warned to stay off the street and stay home as now more violence is expected to break out, a CNN report details. More video is here of the aftermath of the attack.

TIME TO GEAR UP FOR A RENEWED EFFORT!

GET YOUR SENATORS TO CO-SPONSOR S.1763, THE COLD WAR MEDAL ACT OF 2007!

GET PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES TO PUBLICLY COMMIT TO SUPPORTING COLD WAR MEDAL!

We are grateful to those legislators who supported a Cold War Medal, especially Representative Robert Andrews of New Jersey, and Senators Clinton, Collins, and Lincoln. Ask Your senators to join them in co sponsorship of S.1763, the COLD WAR MEDAL ACT OF 2007 (the legislation is before the Senate Armed Services Committee).

Senator Listings

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WE WILL REMEMBER

Reloading for 2008 CWSM Campaign

COLD WAR VICTORY MEDAL STRIPPED OUT OF NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR 2008:

TIME TO GEAR UP FOR A RENEWED EFFORT!
GET YOUR SENATORS TO CO-SPONSOR S.1763, THE COLD WAR MEDAL ACT OF 2007! GET PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES TO PUBLICLY COMMIT TO SUPPORTING COLD WAR MEDAL!





We are grateful to those legislators who supported a Cold War Medal, especially Representative Robert Andrews of New Jersey, and Senators Clinton, Collins, and Lincoln. Ask Your senators to join them in co sponsorship of S.1763, the COLD WAR MEDAL ACT OF 2007
Senator Listings

Senators who have sponsored the Cold War Medal Act include Senator Hillary Clinton, Senator Susan Collins and Senator Blanche Lincoln.

Presidential candidates who have supported the Cold War Medal Act include Senator Hillary Clinton and Senator John Edwards. Representative Ron Paul introduced the Cold War Service Medal legislation in a previous Congress.













US Air Force Cold War vets Scott L’Ecuyer and Chuck Norris meet in New Hampshire. They discussed the American Cold War Veterans organization and the campaign to get a Cold War Medal enacted. Chuck served at Osan Air Force Base in Korea, and Scott with the Strategic Air Command.


















November 16, 2007 – ACWV Associate Membership Director Scott L’Ecuyer meets with Former President Bill Clinton during a presidential campaign event for Senator Hillary Clinton. Scott spoke to President Clinton about the Cold War Medal legislation, and asked his help in getting it passed.





















ACWV Associate Director for Membership Scott L’Ecuyer with presidential candidate Mike Huckabee. Scott asked Governor Huckabee To pledge to create the Cold War Medal by Executive Order during his administration.

NORTH BALTIMORE, Ohio — The last World War I veteran in Ohio, and one of only three known remaining U.S. veterans of the conflict, has died.

J. Russell Coffey was the last WWI vet in the state, according to the Veterans Affairs Department. He died Thursday at the age of 109, said the Smith-Crates Funeral Home in North Baltimore, about 35 miles south of Toledo.

The funeral home did not say where Coffey died or the cause of death. He had been living in the Blakely Care Center, a nursing home.

Coffey, born Sept. 1, 1898, did not see action overseas. He enlisted in the Army while he was a student at Ohio State University in October 1918, a month before the Allied powers and Germany signed a cease-fire agreement.

Coffey played semipro baseball, earned a doctorate in education from New York University, taught high school and college and raised a family.

He drove his car until he was 104 and lived on his own until three years ago, according to the funeral home.

The other known surviving American soldiers are Frank Buckles, 106, of Charles Town, W.Va., and Harry Landis, of Sun City Center, Fla., according to the Veterans Affairs Department.

New VA Secretary Sworn In
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Secretary of Veterans Affairs James B. Peake. For biography, click here

James Peake Sworn-in as Secretary of Veterans AffairsPresident George W. Bush swore-in the Honorable James B. Peake, M.D., as the sixth Secretary of Veterans Affairs on Thursday, Dec. 20. Vice President Dick Cheney also participated in the ceremony, which took place at VA’s headquarters building in Washington, DC. (more)

President Bush’s Remarks Secretary Peake’s Remarks

Wanted


Website Developer/Programmer to develop a Message Board or Forum for an existing website for a Veterans Service organization. Candidate must know PHP and MYSQL. Interested Parties contact us at info@americancoldwarvets.org

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“It’s like two professional athletes looking for the edge,” says Colonel Ralph Wetterhahn, now retired from the U.S. Air Force. He’s describing how fighter pilot measure one another and their aircrafts and, as a former fighter pilot and crash site investigator, he should know. Standing outside, his eyes squinting against the sun, Wetterhahn brings a standard sort of authority to Nova’s Missing in MiG Alley: he’s been there, which makes his testimony unassailable.

Other interviewees similarly underscore the documentary’s focus on “the world’s first jet war.” Former U.S. F-86 Sabre pilots recall fighting MiG-15 pilots, alternately inexperienced Koreans and veteran Soviets. Their national affiliations were key to the way the Korean War stood in for the Cold War As the documentary reports, the U.S. pilots knew their opponents were Russian, but kept the secret—apparently under orders—in order that the American population would not know. Otherwise, citizens might rise up and “demand action” against the Russians, who by then had developed an atomic bomb. “To avoid WWIII,” the two sides agreed to lie about how they conducted the war.

The more precise benefits of this lie—and who enjoyed them—are questions left unasked in Missing in MiG Alley, which instead lays out an array of mostly superficial stories. Primarily, the documentary extols the pilots’ skills and dogfighty grit (the “better trained” Sabre pilots included some who “went on to be astronauts, like Buzz Aldrin,” who appears in scratchy, stalwart-young-Buzz footage remembering the mission when “I got my first MiG destroyed”), as well as their courage in the face of physical hardships. The program spends some time explaining how gravity affects humans in speeding cockpits, and the advantages of G-suits: since Sabre pilots were advised to dive fast in order to escape MiGs, they were at regular risk of “blacking out.”

The jets used different technologies (the MiGs had advanced Rolls-Royce engines, courtesy of the British, who cut deals with their new buddies the Russians following WWII; the Sabres were based on Nazi designs, with swept wings), and the documentary emphasizes the efforts of both sides to get hold of the other’s covert equipment. To this end, the Russians were especially eager to get actual jets. So they shot down as many as they could, hoping some would come to ground in legible form.

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